` CSHLPress.com - toxic milk

CSHL Press News

Toxic Milk: Scientists find key protein affecting quality of maternal-infant

07/24/2007
Toxic Milk: Scientists find key protein affecting quality of maternal-infant nutrition


In the August 1 issue of Genes & Development, Dr. Ronald Evans (Salk Institute) and colleagues report on their discovery that mutations in the mouse gene encoding PPARg adversely affect lactation milk quality, and have serious health consequences for nursing pups.

“By examining PPARg functions in vivo, our work reveals an unexpected link between diet, inflammation and the quality of mothers milk, “ explained Dr. Evans.

PPARg (peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor gamma) is a nuclear receptor that is known to regulate metabolism and inflammation in various organisms. In fact, human PPARg is the main target of the drug class of thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which is used to manage diabetes.

Dr. Evans and colleagues sought to determine the role of PPARg in the lactating mammary gland. They generated a strain of mice that, as adults, lacked PPARg only in hematopoietic and endothelial cells. When these PPARg-deficient animals became mothers, they appeared normal, but the milk they produced most certainly was not.

"We were delighted and surprised by the discovery because it directly explores one of life's most common events - breast feeding. These findings will enhance the understanding of why milk is healthful and the molecular pathways that create the bodies own quality control pipe line," says Dr. Evans.

The researchers noticed that pups of the PPARg-deficient females – who were, themselves, genetically normal - were displaying a number of abnormalities, most noticeably marked hair loss across their trunks and growth retardation. The scientists determined that these abnormalities were due to their ingestion of “toxic milk” from their PPARg-deficient mothers: Either fostering by PPARg-normal mothers or weaning to solid food effectively cured these small and balding pups.

Through a variety of experimental approaches, Dr. Evans and colleagues determined that PPARg loss results in increased levels of pro-inflammatory lipids being released into the mothers’ milk. Ingestion of this “toxic milk” sets off an inflammatory response in the skin of nursing pups, which ultimately disrupts the hair growth cycle and renders them largely bald. In fact, treatment with the common anti-inflammatory aspirin completely rescues hair loss in these pups.


Genes & Development is a publication of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. The Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is a private, non-profit, basic research and educational institution. Scientists at the Laboratory conduct groundbreaking research in cancer, neurobiology, plant molecular genetics, genomics and bioinformatics. The Laboratory is recognized internationally for its educational activities, which include an extensive program of scientific meetings and courses that attract more than 8000 scientists to the campus each year. For more information about the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, visit http://www.cshl.org or call the Department of Public Affairs at (516) 367-8455.

Contact:
Heather Cosel-Pieper
Genes & Development
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
tel. (516) 422-4018
fax (516) 422-4093




Return to CSHL Press News index